Characteristics of the peanut chain in Europe – Implications for peanut allergy

Journal article


Prusak, Anna, Schlegel-Zawadzka, Małgorzata, Boulay, Annabelle and Rowe, Gene 2014. Characteristics of the peanut chain in Europe – Implications for peanut allergy. Acta Scientiarum Polonorum, Technologia Alimentaria. https://doi.org/10.17306/J.AFS.2014.3.10
AuthorsPrusak, Anna, Schlegel-Zawadzka, Małgorzata, Boulay, Annabelle and Rowe, Gene
Abstract

Background. Peanuts are one of the main food allergens, occasionally responsible for life-threatening reactions. Thus, many studies have tried to find a connection between peanut allergy prevalence and processes in the peanut chain that may contribute to the peanut allergenicity. To inform this discussion, this paper outlines experiences in peanut cultivation, trade and processing in Europe, focusing on four European countries with different peanut experiences (Poland, Bulgaria, Spain and the UK). Material and method. Results here are based on documentary analysis and semi-structured, face-to-face interviews with 32 experts involved in various stages of the peanut chain, including peanut farmers, processors, traders, food technologists and manufacturers. Results. A common peanut chain diagram has been drawn considering shelled and in-shell peanuts. The analysis of each stage of peanut processing has been made in accordance with this peanut chain schema. Thermal and mechanical processes are discussed alongside the resultant end peanut products available for European consumers. The paper also analyses the main trends of peanut trade in Europe. The results suggest that the majority of peanut products in Europe are roasted, implying enhanced exposure of the population to more allergenic peanuts. Conclusion. The presented schema and related discussion bring together diverse aspects of peanut production, trade and processing. The main factor associated with the increased allergenicity of peanuts appears to be high temperature roasting. Frying and boiling are also thermal processes, but fried and boiled peanuts have been associated with reduce peanut allergenicity. Neither country of origin nor cultivar type appear to be related to differential peanut allergenicity. More research is needed as regards the impact of various additives, such as chocolate (which is also considered an allergen) on the allergenicity of peanut products. The use of peanuts in non-food products also needs more investigation.

Background. Peanuts are one of the main food allergens, occasionally responsible for life-threatening reactions. Thus, many studies have tried to find a connection between peanut allergy prevalence and processes in the peanut chain that may contribute to the peanut allergenicity. To inform this discussion, this paper outlines experiences in peanut cultivation, trade and processing in Europe, focusing on four European countries with
different peanut experiences (Poland, Bulgaria, Spain and the UK).
Material and method. Results here are based on documentary analysis and semi-structured, face-to-face interviews with 32 experts involved in various stages of the peanut chain, including peanut farmers, processors, traders, food technologists and manufacturers.
Results. A common peanut chain diagram has been drawn considering shelled and in-shell peanuts. The analysis of each stage of peanut processing has been made in accordance with this peanut chain schema. Thermal and mechanical processes are discussed alongside the resultant end peanut products available for European consumers. The paper also analyses the main trends of peanut trade in Europe. The results suggest that the majority of peanut products in Europe are roasted, implying enhanced exposure of the population to more allergenic peanuts.
Conclusion. The presented schema and related discussion bring together diverse aspects of peanut production, trade and processing. The main factor associated with the increased allergenicity of peanuts appears to be high temperature roasting. Frying and boiling are also thermal processes, but fried and boiled peanuts have been associated with reduce peanut allergenicity. Neither country of origin nor cultivar type appear to be related to differential peanut allergenicity. More research is needed as regards the impact of various additives, such as chocolate (which is also considered an allergen) on the allergenicity of peanut products. The use of peanuts in non-food products also needs more investigation.

KeywordsPeanut allergy; Peanut chain; Peanut processing; Peanut cultivars; Allergy
Year2014
JournalActa Scientiarum Polonorum, Technologia Alimentaria
PublisherUniversity of Life Sciences in Poznań - Poland
ISSN16440730
18989594
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.17306/J.AFS.2014.3.10
Web address (URL)http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621263
hdl:10545/621263
Publication dates03 Oct 2014
Publication process dates
Deposited17 Jan 2017, 11:24
ContributorsJagiellonian University, Jagiellonian University, University of Exeter and Gene Rowe Evaluation
File
File Access Level
Open
File
File Access Level
Open
File
File Access Level
Open
Permalink -

https://repository.derby.ac.uk/item/94901/characteristics-of-the-peanut-chain-in-europe-implications-for-peanut-allergy

Download files

  • 0
    total views
  • 0
    total downloads
  • 0
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Export as

Related outputs

Peanut exposure during pregnancy, breastfeeding and complementary feeding: perceptions of practices in four countries
Boulay, Annabelle, Gancheva, Vyara, Houghton, Julie, Strada, Anna, Sora, Beatriz, Sala, Roser and Rowe, Gene 2015. Peanut exposure during pregnancy, breastfeeding and complementary feeding: perceptions of practices in four countries. International Journal of Consumer Studies. https://doi.org/10.1111/ijcs.12151