Interviewing in virtual environments: Towards understanding the impact of rapport-building behaviours and retrieval context on eyewitness memory

Journal article


Professor Coral J Dando, Donna A. Taylor, Alessandra Caso, Zacharia Nahouli and Charlotte Adam 2022. Interviewing in virtual environments: Towards understanding the impact of rapport-building behaviours and retrieval context on eyewitness memory. Memory and Cognition . 51, p. 404–421. https://doi.org/10.3758/s13421-022-01362-7
AuthorsProfessor Coral J Dando, Donna A. Taylor, Alessandra Caso, Zacharia Nahouli and Charlotte Adam
Abstract

Given the complexities of episodic memory and necessarily social nature of in-person face-to-face interviews, theoretical and evidence-based techniques for collecting episodic information from witnesses, victims, and survivors champion rapport-building. Rapport is believed to reduce some of the social demands of recalling an experienced event in an interview context, potentially increasing cognitive capacity for remembering. Cognitive and social benefits have also emerged in remote interview contexts with reduced anxiety and social pressure contributing to improved performance. Here, we investigated episodic memory in mock-eyewitness interviews conducted in virtual environments (VE) and in-person face-to-face (FtF), where rapport-building behaviours were either present or absent. Main effects revealed when rapport was present and where interviews were conducted in a VE participants recalled more correct event information, made fewer errors and were more accurate. Moreover, participants in the VE plus rapport-building present condition outperformed participants in all other conditions. Feedback indicated both rapport and environment were important for reducing the social demands of a recall interview, towards supporting effortful remembering. Our results add to the emerging literature on the utility of virtual environments as interview spaces and lend further support to the importance of prosocial behaviours in applied contexts.

Keywordsepisodic memory; in-person face-to-face interviews; rapport-building
Year2022
JournalMemory and Cognition
Journal citation51, p. 404–421
PublisherSpringer
ISSN0090-502X
1532-5946
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.3758/s13421-022-01362-7
Web address (URL)http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-022-01362-7
Output statusPublished
Publication dates17 Oct 2022
Publication process dates
Accepted26 Sep 2022
Deposited06 Mar 2023
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https://repository.derby.ac.uk/item/9x7x2/interviewing-in-virtual-environments-towards-understanding-the-impact-of-rapport-building-behaviours-and-retrieval-context-on-eyewitness-memory

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