Ingestion of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) following a fatiguing bout of exercise accelerates post-exercise acid-base balance recovery and improves subsequent high-intensity cycling time to exhaustion.

Journal article


Gough, Lewis A., Rimmer, Steven, Osler, Callum J. and Higgins, Matthew F. 2017. Ingestion of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) following a fatiguing bout of exercise accelerates post-exercise acid-base balance recovery and improves subsequent high-intensity cycling time to exhaustion. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism. https://doi.org/10.1123/ijsnem.2017-0065
AuthorsGough, Lewis A., Rimmer, Steven, Osler, Callum J. and Higgins, Matthew F.
Abstract

This study evaluated the ingestion of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) on post-exercise acid-base balance recovery kinetics and subsequent high-intensity cycling time to exhaustion. In a counterbalanced, crossover design, nine healthy and active males (age: 23±2 years, height: 179±5 cm, body mass: 74±9 kg, peak mean minute power (WPEAK) 256±45 W, peak oxygen uptake (V̇O2PEAK) 46±8 ml.kg-1.min-1) performed a graded incremental exercise test, two familiarisation and two experimental trials. Experimental trials consisted of cycling to volitional exhaustion (TLIM1) at 100% WPEAK on two occasions (TLIM1 and TLIM2) interspersed by a 90 min passive recovery period. Using a double blind approach, 30 min into a 90 min recovery period participants ingested either 0.3 g.kg-1 body mass sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) or a placebo (PLA) containing 0.1 g.kg-1 body mass sodium chloride (NaCl) mixed with 4 ml.kg-1 tap water and 1 ml.kg-1 orange squash. The mean differences between TLIM2 and TLIM1 was larger for PLA compared to NaHCO3 (-53±53 vs. -20±48 s; P=0.008, d=0.7, CI=-0.3, 1.6), indicating superior subsequent exercise time to exhaustion following NaHCO3. Blood lactate [BLa-] was similar between treatments post TLIM1, but greater for NaHCO3 post TLIM2 and 5 min post TLIM2. Ingestion of NaHCO3 induced marked increases (P<0.01) in both blood pH (+0.07±0.02, d=2.6, CI=1.2, 3.7) and bicarbonate ion concentration [HCO3-] (+6.8±1.6 mmo.l-1, d=3.4, CI=1.8, 4.7) compared to the PLA treatment, prior to TLIM2. It is likely both the acceleration of recovery and the marked increases of acid-base after TLIM1 contributed to greater TLIM2 performance compared to the PLA condition.

KeywordsBuffering; Metabolic alkalosis; Fatigue
Year2017
JournalInternational Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
PublisherHuman Kinetics
ISSN1526484X
15432742
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1123/ijsnem.2017-0065
Web address (URL)http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621788
hdl:10545/621788
Publication dates22 May 2017
Publication process dates
Deposited31 Jul 2017, 10:21
Rights

Archived with thanks to International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism

Erratum: Gough et al (2017)
In this article, "Ingestion of Sodium Bicarbonate (NaHCO3) Following a Fatiguing Bout of Exercise Accelerates
Postexercise Acid-Based Balance Recovery and Improves Subsequent High-Intensity Cycling Time to Exhaustion,"
the publisher did not accurately reflect several content and layout corrections which were needed. These include:
(a) The key for Figure 1 was erroneously included for Figure 3 (and not for Figure 1).
(b) The abbreviation for PRE was missing from the Figure 1 key.
(c) Figure 3 contained two indicators (+) which were not necessary.
The published online version of this article has been corrected. The publisher sincerely apologizes for these errors.

ContributorsEdge Hill University, University of Derby, Department of Sport and Physical Activity, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, United Kingdom, Department of Life Sciences, University of Derby, Derby, United Kingdom., Department of Life Sciences, University of Derby, Derby, United Kingdom. and Department of Life Sciences, University of Derby, Derby, United Kingdom.
File
File Access Level
Controlled
File
File Access Level
Open
Permalink -

https://repository.derby.ac.uk/item/9255q/ingestion-of-sodium-bicarbonate-nahco3-following-a-fatiguing-bout-of-exercise-accelerates-post-exercise-acid-base-balance-recovery-and-improves-subsequent-high-intensity-cycling-time-to-exhaustion

Download files

  • 15
    total views
  • 0
    total downloads
  • 1
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Export as

Related outputs

Effects of mental fatigue on static upright stance and functional balance in older adults
Fletcher, Lucy J. and Osler, Callum J. 2021. Effects of mental fatigue on static upright stance and functional balance in older adults. Aging and Health Research. 1 (4), p. 100043. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ahr.2021.100043
Effects of Caffeine Ingestion on Human Standing Balance: A Systematic Review of Placebo-Controlled Trials.
Briggs, Isobel, Chidley, Joel, Chidley, Corinna and Osler, Callum 2021. Effects of Caffeine Ingestion on Human Standing Balance: A Systematic Review of Placebo-Controlled Trials. Nutrients. 13 (10). https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13103527
Increased gravitational force reveals the mechanical, resonant nature of physiological tremor
Lakie, M., Vernooij, C. A., Osler, Callum J., Stevenson, A. T., Scott, J. P. R. and Reynolds, Raymond Francis 2015. Increased gravitational force reveals the mechanical, resonant nature of physiological tremor. The Journal of Physiology. https://doi.org/10.1113/JP270464
Rebuttal from Raymond Reynolds, Callum Osler, Linda Tersteeg and Ian Loram
Reynolds, Raymond Francis, Osler, Callum J., Tersteeg, M. C. A. and Loram, Ian D. 2015. Rebuttal from Raymond Reynolds, Callum Osler, Linda Tersteeg and Ian Loram. The Journal of Physiology. https://doi.org/10.1113/JP270804
Crosstalk opposing view: Fear of falling does not influence vestibular-evoked balance responses
Reynolds, Raymond Francis, Osler, Callum J., Tersteeg, M. C. A. and Loram, Ian D. 2015. Crosstalk opposing view: Fear of falling does not influence vestibular-evoked balance responses. The Journal of Physiology. https://doi.org/10.1113/JP270444
Mechanisms of interpersonal sway synchrony and stability
Reynolds, Raymond Francis and Osler, Callum J. 2014. Mechanisms of interpersonal sway synchrony and stability. Journal of The Royal Society Interface. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsif.2014.0751
Postural reorientation does not cause the locomotor after-effect following rotary locomotion
Osler, Callum J. and Reynolds, Raymond Francis 2012. Postural reorientation does not cause the locomotor after-effect following rotary locomotion. Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00221-012-3132-6
Galvanic vestibular stimulation produces sensations of rotation consistent with activation of semicircular canal afferents
Reynolds, Raymond Francis and Osler, Callum J. 2012. Galvanic vestibular stimulation produces sensations of rotation consistent with activation of semicircular canal afferents. Frontiers in Neurology. https://doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2012.00104
Dynamic transformation of vestibular signals for orientation
Osler, Callum J. and Reynolds, Raymond Francis 2012. Dynamic transformation of vestibular signals for orientation. Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00221-012-3250-1
Postural threat differentially affects the feedforward and feedback components of the vestibular-evoked balance response
Osler, Callum J., Tersteeg, M. C. A., Reynolds, Raymond Francis and Loram, Ian D. 2013. Postural threat differentially affects the feedforward and feedback components of the vestibular-evoked balance response. Wiley. https://doi.org/10.1111/ejn.12336