How do hand therapists conservatively manage acute, closed mallet finger? A survey of members of the British Association of Hand Therapists.

Journal article


Cook, Samantha, Daniels, N. and Woodbridge, Sarah 2016. How do hand therapists conservatively manage acute, closed mallet finger? A survey of members of the British Association of Hand Therapists. Hand Therapy. https://doi.org/10.1177/1758998316664822
AuthorsCook, Samantha, Daniels, N. and Woodbridge, Sarah
Abstract

Introduction Previous research concerning the conservative management of mallet finger has focused on splint application, with limited representation of supplementary rehabilitation and best practice. This research sought to investigate the practice and opinions of members of the British Association of Hand Therapists regarding their current treatment and to determine whether any specific exercise prescription or rehabilitation protocols are followed. Methods British Association of Hand Therapists members were contacted via e-mail and requested to complete an online survey. Thirty-five responses (5.7% response rate), 30 (4.8% response rate) of which were fully completed were obtained over the eight-week data collection period. The questionnaire consisted of 30 questions (20 quantitative and 10 qualitative) concerning therapists’ roles and condition management. Responses were analysed in terms of response frequencies, percentages and thematic text analysis. Results The results demonstrated current clinical practices in line with available best-evidenced practice. Conservative therapeutic management is diverse and varied. Therapists believe their role to be significant in optimising outcome success. Discussion Exercises and other interventions supplementary to splinting are commonly utilised in the therapeutic management of acute, closed mallet finger. This research found hand therapists implement a diverse range of clinical skills in order to optimise outcome success. Recommendations for best practice and further research are presented.

Introduction
Previous research concerning the conservative management of mallet finger has focused on splint application, with limited representation of supplementary rehabilitation and best practice. This research sought to investigate the practice and opinions of members of the British Association of Hand Therapists regarding their current treatment and to determine whether any specific exercise prescription or rehabilitation protocols are followed.
Methods
British Association of Hand Therapists members were contacted via e-mail and requested to complete an online survey. Thirty-five responses (5.7% response rate), 30 (4.8% response rate) of which were fully completed were obtained over the eight-week data collection period. The questionnaire consisted of 30 questions (20 quantitative and 10 qualitative) concerning therapists’ roles and condition management. Responses were analysed in terms of response frequencies, percentages and thematic text analysis.
Results
The results demonstrated current clinical practices in line with available best-evidenced practice. Conservative therapeutic management is diverse and varied. Therapists believe their role to be significant in optimising outcome success.
Discussion
Exercises and other interventions supplementary to splinting are commonly utilised in the therapeutic management of acute, closed mallet finger. This research found hand therapists implement a diverse range of clinical skills in order to optimise outcome success. Recommendations for best practice and further research are presented.

KeywordsMallet finger; Rehabilitation; Hand therapy; Exercise
Year2016
JournalHand Therapy
PublisherSage
ISSN17589983
17589991
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1177/1758998316664822
Web address (URL)http://hdl.handle.net/10545/622422
hdl:10545/622422
Publication dates13 Aug 2016
Publication process dates
Deposited21 Mar 2018, 15:53
Accepted22 Jul 2016
Rights

Archived with thanks to Hand Therapy

ContributorsBarnsley Hospital, University of Derby, Physiotherapy Department, Barnsley Hospital, Barnsley, UK, College of Health and Social Care, University of Derby, Derby, UK and College of Health and Social Care, University of Derby, Derby, UK
File
File Access Level
Open
Permalink -

https://repository.derby.ac.uk/item/928yx/how-do-hand-therapists-conservatively-manage-acute-closed-mallet-finger-a-survey-of-members-of-the-british-association-of-hand-therapists

Download files

  • 14
    total views
  • 0
    total downloads
  • 0
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Export as

Related outputs

Peer interactions and their benefits during occupational therapy practice placement education.
Daniels, N. 2010. Peer interactions and their benefits during occupational therapy practice placement education. British Journal of Occupational Therapy. https://doi.org/10.4276/030802210X12629548272664