A sled push stimulus potentiates subsequent 20-m sprint performance.

Journal article


Seitz, Laurent B., Mina, M. and Haff, Guy Gregory 2017. A sled push stimulus potentiates subsequent 20-m sprint performance. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2016.12.074
AuthorsSeitz, Laurent B., Mina, M. and Haff, Guy Gregory
Abstract

Abstract OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to examine the potentiating effects of performing a single sprint-style sled push on subsequent unresisted 20m sprint performance. DESIGN: Randomized crossover design. METHODS: Following a familiarization session, twenty rugby league players performed maximal unresisted 20m sprints before and 15s, 4, 8 and 12min after a single sled push stimulus loaded with either 75 or 125% body mass. The two sled push conditions were performed in a randomized order over a one-week period. The fastest sprint time recorded before each sled push was compared to that recorded at each time point after to determine the post-activation potentiation (PAP) effect. RESULTS: After the 75% body mass sled push, sprint time was 0.26±1.03% slower at the 15s time point (effect size [ES]=0.07) but faster at the 4 (-0.95±2.00%; ES=-0.22), 8 (-1.80±1.43%; ES=-0.42) and 12 (-1.54±1.54%; ES=-0.36)min time points. Sprint time was slower at all the time points after the 125% body mass sled (1.36±2.36%-2.59±2.90%; ESs=0.34-0.64). CONCLUSIONS: Twenty-meter sprint performance is potentiated 4-12min following a sled push loaded with 75% body mass while it is impaired after a 125% body mass sled. These results are of great importance for coaches seeking to potentiate sprint performance with the sled push exercise.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The objective of this study was to examine the potentiating effects of performing a single sprint-style sled push on subsequent unresisted 20m sprint performance.

DESIGN:

Randomized crossover design.

METHODS:

Following a familiarization session, twenty rugby league players performed maximal unresisted 20m sprints before and 15s, 4, 8 and 12min after a single sled push stimulus loaded with either 75 or 125% body mass. The two sled push conditions were performed in a randomized order over a one-week period. The fastest sprint time recorded before each sled push was compared to that recorded at each time point after to determine the post-activation potentiation (PAP) effect.

RESULTS:

After the 75% body mass sled push, sprint time was 0.26±1.03% slower at the 15s time point (effect size [ES]=0.07) but faster at the 4 (-0.95±2.00%; ES=-0.22), 8 (-1.80±1.43%; ES=-0.42) and 12 (-1.54±1.54%; ES=-0.36)min time points. Sprint time was slower at all the time points after the 125% body mass sled (1.36±2.36%-2.59±2.90%; ESs=0.34-0.64).

CONCLUSIONS:

Twenty-meter sprint performance is potentiated 4-12min following a sled push loaded with 75% body mass while it is impaired after a 125% body mass sled. These results are of great importance for coaches seeking to potentiate sprint performance with the sled push exercise.

KeywordsPostactivation potentiation; Resisted sprinting; Running; Football; Performance; Physical conditioning; Sport science
Year2017
JournalJournal of Science and Medicine in Sport
PublisherElsevier
ISSN14402440
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2016.12.074
Web address (URL)http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621968
hdl:10545/621968
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1440244017302505
Publication dates23 Jan 2017
Publication process dates
Accepted24 Nov 2017, 14:24
Accepted15 Dec 2016
Rights

Archived with thanks to Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

ContributorsEdith Cowan University and University of Derby
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