Freedom of speech in a therapeutic age

Book chapter


Hayes, Dennis 2017. Freedom of speech in a therapeutic age. in: Routledge.
AuthorsHayes, Dennis
Abstract

Roy Harris (2009) and Adrian Pablé (2012) have argued that integrationists, in their philosophy and in their linguistics, have a Socratic approach to freedom of speech that sees vigorous and robust debate as the foundational freedom. Everything must be put to the test of criticism. Every citizen has a moral duty to defend freedom of speech and every academic has a duty to defend freedom of speech as the foundational freedom of the academy. Freedom of speech has historically been restricted and controlled at various times dependant on the contingent concept of human being at any time. Authoritarian attempts to control speech and antipathy to human freedom to assent or dissent from established opinion are familiar. In contemporary therapeutic culture restrictions on freedom of speech appear more kindly but are more authoritarian. Seeing human beings as diminished, vulnerable or mentally unwell provides the basis on which the state and its institutions can intervene and regulate freedom of speech and freedom to hear. Bans and censorship are now seen to be necessary to protect vulnerable individuals rather than to protect the cherished but untested ideas of the new moral elites. The kindliness of the new authoritarianism makes it harder to challenge without the challenger being seen as a victimiser. In the contemporary therapeutic university the right to assent alone is allowed. Even body language, sighs and ironic utterances are questionable. The therapeutic university is becoming the silent university. As the university is the embodiment of societal attitudes to freedom of speech what we are seeing is the creation of the silent student and future citizen who dares not speak; not for fear of being harmed but for fear of harming vulnerable others. References Harris, R. (2009) Freedom of Speech and Philosophy of Education, British Journal of Educational Studies, 57 (2) June 2009: 111-126. Pablé, A. M. (2012) Excommunicated on the grounds of Harrisy: Roy Harris, Linguistics and freedom of speech, in Ashley, LRN & Finke, W (Eds.). Language Under Controls: Policies and Practices Affecting Freedom of Speech: Selected Papers from the International Conference, September 23-24, 2011. East Rockaway, NY: Cummings & Hathaway: 1-12.

Roy Harris (2009) and Adrian Pablé (2012) have argued that integrationists, in their philosophy and in their linguistics, have a Socratic approach to freedom of speech that sees vigorous and robust debate as the foundational freedom. Everything must be put to the test of criticism. Every citizen has a moral duty to defend freedom of speech and every academic has a duty to defend freedom of speech as the foundational freedom of the academy.
Freedom of speech has historically been restricted and controlled at various times dependant on the contingent concept of human being at any time. Authoritarian attempts to control speech and antipathy to human freedom to assent or dissent from established opinion are familiar. In contemporary therapeutic culture restrictions on freedom of speech appear more kindly but are more authoritarian. Seeing human beings as diminished, vulnerable or mentally unwell provides the basis on which the state and its institutions can intervene and regulate freedom of speech and freedom to hear.
Bans and censorship are now seen to be necessary to protect vulnerable individuals rather than to protect the cherished but untested ideas of the new moral elites. The kindliness of the new authoritarianism makes it harder to challenge without the challenger being seen as a victimiser. In the contemporary therapeutic university the right to assent alone is allowed. Even body language, sighs and ironic utterances are questionable. The therapeutic university is becoming the silent university. As the university is the embodiment of societal attitudes to freedom of speech what we are seeing is the creation of the silent student and future citizen who dares not speak; not for fear of being harmed but for fear of harming vulnerable others.
References

Harris, R. (2009) Freedom of Speech and Philosophy of Education, British Journal of Educational Studies, 57 (2) June 2009: 111-126.

Pablé, A. M. (2012) Excommunicated on the grounds of Harrisy: Roy Harris, Linguistics and freedom of speech, in Ashley, LRN & Finke, W (Eds.). Language Under Controls: Policies and Practices Affecting Freedom of Speech: Selected Papers from the International Conference, September 23-24, 2011. East Rockaway, NY: Cummings & Hathaway: 1-12.

KeywordsFree speech; Vulnerablility; Safe spaces
Year2017
PublisherRoutledge
ISBN9781138656710
Web address (URL)http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621640
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/
hdl:10545/621640
File
File Access Level
Open
File
File Access Level
Open
Publication datesMay 2017
Publication process dates
Deposited14 Jun 2017, 11:32
ContributorsUniversity of Derby
Permalink -

https://repository.derby.ac.uk/item/92z30/freedom-of-speech-in-a-therapeutic-age

Download files


File
license_url
File access level: Open

license.txt
File access level: Open

  • 40
    total views
  • 0
    total downloads
  • 0
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Export as

Related outputs

Raising regional academic voices (alongside data) in higher education (HE) debate
Hayes, Sarah, Jopling, Michael, Hayes, Dennis, Westwood, Andy, Tuckett, Alan, Barnett, Ronald and Hayes, Dennis 2020. Raising regional academic voices (alongside data) in higher education (HE) debate. Postdigital Education and Science. https://doi.org/10.1007/s42438-020-00131-6
How the university lost its way: Sixteen threats to academic freedom
Hayes, Dennis 2019. How the university lost its way: Sixteen threats to academic freedom. Postdigital Science and Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s42438-019-00079-2
Socrates for Teachers
Hayes, Dennis 2019. Socrates for Teachers. in: Routledge.
The Dangerous Rise of Therapeutic Education
Hayes, Dennis and Ecclestone, Kathryn 2019. The Dangerous Rise of Therapeutic Education. Routledge Education Classic Editions.
The McDonaldization of higher education revisited.
Hayes, Dennis and Wynyard, Robin 2016. The McDonaldization of higher education revisited. in: Routledge.
Book Review: Academic Freedom in an Age of Conformity: confronting the fear of knowledge, by Joanna Williams
Hayes, Dennis 2017. Book Review: Academic Freedom in an Age of Conformity: confronting the fear of knowledge, by Joanna Williams. British Journal of Educational Studies. https://doi.org/10.1080/00071005.2017.1312822
The refuge of relativism.
Hayes, Dennis and Mieschbuehler, Ruth 2015. The refuge of relativism. in: Routledge.
The role of the teacher today
Hayes, Dennis and Marshall, Toby 2016. The role of the teacher today. SCETT.
The McDonaldization of higher education
Hayes, Dennis, Wynyard, Robin and Mandal, Luna 2017. The McDonaldization of higher education.
How trigger warnings shoot down free debate
Hayes, Dennis 2014. How trigger warnings shoot down free debate.
Teaching in post-14 education & training (5th Edition)
Hayes, Dennis, Armitage, Andy, Lawes, Shirley, Cogger, Alison, Evershed, Jane and Renwick, Mandy 2016. Teaching in post-14 education & training (5th Edition). Open University Press.
Is everyone a Socrates now? A critical look at critical thinking
Hayes, Dennis 2016. Is everyone a Socrates now? A critical look at critical thinking. in: Routledge.
The uses of a chronology: a guide for students
Hayes, Dennis and Browne, Liz 2017. The uses of a chronology: a guide for students. University of Derby.
Beyond the therapeutic university
Hayes, Dennis 2017. Beyond the therapeutic university. in: Routledge.
After Brexit, snowflake professors need to grow up
Hayes, Dennis 2016. After Brexit, snowflake professors need to grow up.
Is it time to rethink the 'university'?
Hayes, Dennis 2017. Is it time to rethink the 'university'? Ethical Record.
How 'learning styles' undermine education
Hayes, Dennis 2017. How 'learning styles' undermine education. spiked.
Beyond McDonaldization: visions of higher education
Hayes, Dennis 2017. Beyond McDonaldization: visions of higher education. Routledge.
Academic freedom means free speech and no "buts"
Hayes, Dennis 2008. Academic freedom means free speech and no "buts". The Free Society.
The Routledge guide to key debates in education
Hayes, Dennis 2004. The Routledge guide to key debates in education. Routledge.
In defence of teacher education
Hayes, Dennis and Marshall, Toby 2011. In defence of teacher education. Standing Committee for the Education and Training of Teachers (SCETT).
The academics vs the bureaucracy
Hayes, Dennis 2016. The academics vs the bureaucracy. spiked.
Why important education research often gets ignored
Hayes, Dennis 2014. Why important education research often gets ignored. The Conversation.
Affect: knowledge, communication, creativity and emotion
Ecclestone, Kathryn and Hayes, Dennis 2008. Affect: knowledge, communication, creativity and emotion. Futurelab.
The 50 great books on education
Hayes, Dennis 2016. The 50 great books on education. The Conversation.
Even extremists have a right to freedom of speech on campus
Hayes, Dennis 2014. Even extremists have a right to freedom of speech on campus. The Conversation.
The dangerous rise of therapeutic education
Hayes, Dennis and Ecclestone, Kathryn 2008. The dangerous rise of therapeutic education. Routledge.
Changing the subject: the educational implications of developing emotional well‐being
Ecclestone, Kathryn and Hayes, Dennis 2009. Changing the subject: the educational implications of developing emotional well‐being. Oxford Review of Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03054980902934662
Academic freedom and the diminished subject
Hayes, Dennis 2009. Academic freedom and the diminished subject. British Journal of Educational Studies. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8527.2009.00432.x